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Armin Stein

Lunchtime Seminar - Deep Recommendation based on Collective Knowledge

Dienstag, 10. April 2018 - 12:00 bis 13:00, Leo 18, Leonardo-Campus 3, 48149 Münster

Nowadays, we have a huge amount of information overload over Internet. To extract useful information, filtering is required. Search engines help to solve this problem to some extent but they do not deliver customized (personalized) information. Hence, there is a need for effective recommendation tools. This line of investigation leads to our central specific question for the present project. We rephrase Turing’s dictum in the following question. Can recommendation systems think? Answers to this question will have strong implications for the more general issue of whether and how far modern systems mirror our thinking. This observation has motivated us to investigate whether the collective knowledge of the community as a whole could be used to help computer systems extend their intelligent abilities.

Our common project focuses on various learning methods used in generating recommendation models and evaluation metrics used in measuring the quality and performance of recommendation algorithms. This knowledge will empower researchers from both universities and serve as a road map to improve the state of the art recommendation techniques. A combination of different complimentary methods is likely to give a more robust performance to the systems.

Weiterlesen über Lunchtime Seminar - Deep Recommendation based on Collective Knowledge
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Armin Stein

Lunchtime Seminar - The Role of Information Systems in Shaping the Dynamics of Organizational Attention: Reflections and Empirical Evidence

Dienstag, 17. April 2018 - 12:00 bis 13:00, Leo 18, Leonardo-Campus 3, 48149 Münster

William Ocasio defines organizational attention as the “noticing, encoding, interpreting, and focusing of time and effort by organizational decision makers on issues and answers” (p. 189). Attention is a scarce and critical resource that is distributed in the organization to foster the focus on a diverse set of issues and action alternatives. Organizational strategy acts as a guide to the distribution of the attention effort in the organization, coherent interconnection between pockets of shared attention and development of collective capacity to respond coherently to internal and external stimuli. Changes in the organizational strategy often arise as result of changes in the external environment or when the usual problem solving logic is no longer effective.
Readiness for strategic change requires that attention structures and communication channels are flexible and adaptable to the new needs of collective attention. According to (William Ocasio et al., 2018) there’s “a rather limited understanding of communicative practices in various communication channels and particularly the extent to which they reinforce existing patterns of organizational attention or facilitate the formulation and implementation of strategic change” (p. 159). The talk addresses research carried out with the objective of providing empirical evidence for the role that communicative practices play in facilitating the formulation and implementation of strategic change, with a particular focus on communicative practices supported or enabled by information systems.

Weiterlesen über Lunchtime Seminar - The Role of Information Systems in Shaping the Dynamics of Organizational Attention: Reflections and Empirical Evidence
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Ursula Kortemeyer

Prof. Dr. Edzer Pebesma

Dienstag, 22. April 2014 - 12:00 bis 13:00, Leonardo-Campus 18

With increasing amounts and variety of and access to open data collected in our environment, the distance between those who understand the data observation processes and those who analyse the data increases. This enlarges the risk of carrying out operations that are not meaningful, such as summing temperature values or interpolating coal power plant emissions. To avoid the need for tables with permitted analysis procedure for every phenomenon, we attempt to categorize phenomena first. Combining the ideas of Stevens' (1946) one-dimensional measurement scale types with those of spatial and temporal reference systems, we construct compound reference systems that address how space, time, quality, and entity cohere. What we find formalizes ideas established in spatial statistics over three decades ago, but has not been reflected well in spatial data standardization efforts, or spatial data base design. The talk will discuss the potential of these findings, implementation challenges, and their value for relational and array data bases for spatio-temporal data.

Weiterlesen über Prof. Dr. Edzer Pebesma
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Ursula Kortemeyer

Prof. Dr. Edzer Pebesma

Dienstag, 22. April 2014 - 12:00 bis 13:00, Leonardo-Campus 18

With increasing amounts and variety of and access to open data collected in our environment, the distance between those who understand the data observation processes and those who analyse the data increases. This enlarges the risk of carrying out operations that are not meaningful, such as summing temperature values or interpolating coal power plant emissions. To avoid the need for tables with permitted analysis procedure for every phenomenon, we attempt to categorize phenomena first. Combining the ideas of Stevens' (1946) one-dimensional measurement scale types with those of spatial and temporal reference systems, we construct compound reference systems that address how space, time, quality, and entity cohere. What we find formalizes ideas established in spatial statistics over three decades ago, but has not been reflected well in spatial data standardization efforts, or spatial data base design. The talk will discuss the potential of these findings, implementation challenges, and their value for relational and array data bases for spatio-temporal data.

Weiterlesen über Prof. Dr. Edzer Pebesma