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Denis Mayr Lima Martins

When do good communication models fail in global virtual teams?

Tuesday, 16. November 2021 - 17:00 to 18:00, Zoom

Speaker: Dr. Sirkka L. Jarvenpaa, The University of Texas at Austin, USA.

Abstract: Global virtual teams represent temporary work systems that are assembled for a joint task, performed by team members who collaborate primarily via digital technologies. Team members span geography and culture and often have only a narrow period of shared work hours. Within highly constrained temporal spaces, team members coordinate and collaborate on joint tasks with many task interdependencies, requiring constant back-and-forth workflows among members. Leveraging various synchronous and asynchronous virtual communication modes, the teams must communicate effectively to prevent prolonged misunderstandings and work delays. The virtual team environment is challenging because virtual space reduces opportunities for team members to grasp important aspects of the actual social surroundings of the members that are critical for understanding.

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Denis Mayr Lima Martins

Watch Me Get Better! – Algorithm Aversion and Demonstrating the Ability to Learn

Tuesday, 26. October 2021 - 12:00 to 13:00, Zoom

Speaker: Prof. Dr. Benedikt Berger, Department of Information Systems, the University of Münster, Germany.
 
Talk abstract: Owing to advancements in artificial intelligence (AI) and specifically in machine learning, information technology (IT) systems can support humans in an increasing number of tasks. Yet, previous research indicates that people often prefer support by a human to support by an IT system, even if the latter provides superior performance—a phenomenon called algorithm aversion. In this talk, Prof. Dr. Berger presents a study that evaluates the effectiveness of demonstrating the ability to learn of an AI-based system as a potential countermeasure against algorithm aversion in an incentive-compatible online experiment. The findings provide theoretical and practical implications for the employment and design of AI-based systems.

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